Using flint tools in the mud

The coup has become incredibly muddy after so much prolonged rain and it is hard to believe how you would have coped with these muddy conditions in the Stone Age. No grippy, steel toe capped boots in Neolithic times!
The focus of today was to continue with our use of flint tools to coppice the hazel in our coup. It was interesting to see how much time Neolithic people would have had to spend removing the enough material to make their houses. Our flint tools have been made by one of our volunteers James Dilley, who trades under the name Ancient Craft.
Some of the flint axes before they were hafted.

Some of the flint axes before they were hafted. Photo by James Dilley

Flint axes and sickles, now hafted with handles

Flint axes and sickles, now hafted with handles. Photo by James Dilley

A fully hafted and bound flint axe, ready for use

A fully hafted and bound flint axe, ready for use. Photo by James Dilley

We have had some breakages of our flint axes and it is now a question of whether our technique is lacking or whether our Neolithic ancestors had the same problems, and, if they did, were they all capable of repairing these axes when they were damaged.
One of the flint axes in use. Photo by Keith Murray

One of the flint axes in use. Photo by Keith Murray

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2 thoughts on “Using flint tools in the mud

  1. An interesting adventure! Do archeological finds indicate that these tools were the ones used for this purpose in neolithic times? (Axes could be used, but there are several other ways to do the task)

    • Hi Jon. Thanks! Flint axes are common finds from the Neolithic period. We might use a saw today, and although prehistoric people had the ability to make saw-like stone tools (called micro-denticulates!) these wouldn’t have been tough enough to saw wood and would probably have snapped. They are more likely to have been used for cutting fibres etc. We’ll be using flint sickles to cut some of the roofing materials.

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